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Nasa astronaut wishes Earth a happy Hanukah from the International Space Station wishes

Artist’s impression of the International Station (Image: Nasa)
A Nasa astronaut has wished the world a Happy Hanukkah whilst orbiting our planet aboard the International Space Station.

Jessica Mier, 42, posted a picture on Twitter showing her enjoying a very personal celebration whilst gazing down on our beautiful planet.

Meir is the daughter of an Israeli doctor who moved to the US.

She joined the crew of the ISS in September before taking part in the very first all-female spacewalk just two weeks later.

The socks she chose to wear in the picture have been getting a lot of attention, as well as her subtle observance of age-old traditions performed in the modern setting of an orbital space base.

Here’s what the Jerusalem Post said about the socks and the photo: ‘As lighting candles every night is the core tradition of the festival, Hanukkah offers plenty of opportunities for evocative pictures and compelling posts on social media.

‘But lighting fires in outer space can be especia..

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IN SPACE - MAY 29: In this handout provided by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), back dropped by planet Earth the International Space Station (ISS) is seen from NASA space shuttle Endeavour after the station and shuttle began their post-undocking relative separation May 29, 2011 in space. After 20 years, 25 missions and more than 115 million miles in space, NASA space shuttle Endeavour is on the last leg of its final flight to the International Space Station before being retired and donated to the California Science Center in Los Angeles. Capt. Mark E. Kelly, U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' (D-AZ) husband, has lead mission STS-134 as it delivered the Express Logistics Carrier-3 (ELC-3) and the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-2) to the International Space Station. (Photo by NASA via Getty Images)
Artist’s impression of the International Station (Image: Nasa)

A Nasa astronaut has wished the world a Happy Hanukkah whilst orbiting our planet aboard the International Space Station.

Jessica Mier, 42, posted a picture on Twitter showing her enjoying a very personal celebration whilst gazing down on our beautiful planet.

Meir is the daughter of an Israeli doctor who moved to the US.


She joined the crew of the ISS in September before taking part in the very first all-female spacewalk just two weeks later.

The socks she chose to wear in the picture have been getting a lot of attention, as well as her subtle observance of age-old traditions performed in the modern setting of an orbital space base.

Here’s what the Jerusalem Post said about the socks and the photo: ‘As lighting candles every night is the core tradition of the festival, Hanukkah offers plenty of opportunities for evocative pictures and compelling posts on social media.

‘But lighting fires in outer space can be especially challenging, considering that flames can react to the absence of gravity in an uncontrolled manner.

‘Perhaps for this reason, for her message Meir opted for a picture of her feet wrapped in a pair of entertaining socks featuring pink menorahs and green stars of David on a blue background. And she did follow the tradition of placing the menorah close to the window, since behind her feet, the earth is visible thousands of kilometres away.’

Happy Hanukkah to all those who celebrate it on Earth! #HappyHanukkah pic.twitter.com/FKC2M5iXni

— Jessica Meir (@Astro_Jessica) December 23, 2019

What is Hanukkah?

Hanukkah, also known as Chanukah, is the Jewish Festival Of Lights. The date it’s celebrated changes each year, depending on the Western calendar, but it usually falls in November or December.

The celebration dates back to two centuries before Christianity began, and lasts for eight days.

The word ‘Hanukkah’ means dedication, and honours one of the greatest miracles in Jewish history.

When is Hanukkah this year?

Hanukkah 2016 begins on Sunday December 22 and ends on Monday December 30.

What’s the story behind Hanukkah?

The festival is a time for Jewish people to remember their victory in a battle against the Greeks over 2,000 years ago to practice their religion without restriction.

The Greeks had put a stop to all religious practices for the Jews, and King Antiochus tried to make Jewish people bow down before a statue of him that had been placed in the Jewish temple, praying to Greek gods.

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However, they refused, as the Ten Commandments forbid Jews to worship statues or idols.

A small group called the Maccabees fought against it, and after a three-year war, they were able to recapture Jerusalem from the Syrians. However, the Jewish temple was destroyed in the process.

After cleaning and repairing it, they celebrated their victory by lighting an oil lamp, or Menorah, which symbolised God’s presence.

Although there was only enough oil to burn the candle in the temple for one day, it somehow managed to keep going for eight days. The Menorah is one of the oldest symbols in Judaism.

(Picture: Getty)
(Picture: Getty)

How is Hanukkah celebrated today?

One candle on the Hanukiah, a candelabra with nine candles, is lit each day by families, either after sunset or at night.

The lighting of each candle represents the original oil lamp burning for eight days in the temple. The ninth candle is out of place, usually higher than the others, and is lit first, then used to light all the others.

Some families also give each other a small present on each night. Gift-giving has risen in popularity due to the festival’s proximity to Christmas.

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An old European custom is to give Hanukkah gelt (coins or money), but a wider range of presents have been exchanged since the 1950s.

A traditional game played by children and adults involves a dreidel, a four-sided spinning top with a Hebrew letter on each side.

Depending on which side the dreidel lands on when spun, players give or take pieces from a centre pot.

Playing with dreidels (Picture: Getty)
Playing with dreidels (Picture: Getty)

What do Jewish people eat at Hanukkah?

Hanukkah is the time for traditional and celebratory food, with most dishes being deep-fried in oil to represent the miraculous eight-day burning of the Menorah.

Latkes, a kind of potato fritter resembling pancakes, can be topped with sweet and savoury toppings, ranging from cherries and apples to potatoes and carrots.

A sufganiyah is a deep-fried jam or custard-filled doughnut topped with powdered sugar, traditionally eaten in Israel but consumed around the world during Hanukkah due to the fact they are cooked in oil.

Sufganiot doughnuts (Picture: Getty)
Sufganiyot doughnuts (Picture: Getty)

MORE: 12 reasons Chanukah is the absolute best

MORE: This is what Christmas and Hanukkah would be like if they were people


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